Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Cell Culture Systems for Assessing Toxicity and Chemotherapeutic Potential of Phytochemical Antioxidants

Version 1 : Received: 28 September 2021 / Approved: 29 September 2021 / Online: 29 September 2021 (11:11:19 CEST)

How to cite: Asuzu, P.C.; Trompeter, N.; Besong, S.A.; Cooper, C.R.; Aryee, A.N. Cell Culture Systems for Assessing Toxicity and Chemotherapeutic Potential of Phytochemical Antioxidants. Preprints 2021, 2021090488 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0488.v1). Asuzu, P.C.; Trompeter, N.; Besong, S.A.; Cooper, C.R.; Aryee, A.N. Cell Culture Systems for Assessing Toxicity and Chemotherapeutic Potential of Phytochemical Antioxidants. Preprints 2021, 2021090488 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202109.0488.v1).

Abstract

This review article seeks to provide relevant information about the applicability of cell-based assays in assessing cytotoxicity of phytochemicals in light of several traditional methods available. Phenolic compounds and other phytochemicals are significant resources for drug discovery and development, thus underlining the enormous potentials of plant-derived natural products for the prevention and management of oxidative stress associated with cancer and other diseases. These effects have been linked to the content of phytochemicals such as phenolic compounds and their antioxidant properties. The abundance and complexity of these bio-constituents highlight the need for well-defined methods for the in vitro characterization and quantification of extracts and/or preparations that can translate to in vivo effects. Cell culture systems provide a useful model for basic research and a wide range of clinical in vitro studies and physiological processes as well as assessing the toxicity and therapeutic potential of compounds including plant extracts with potential medicinal benefits. Their use in cancer research provide a useful insight into possible therapeutic properties of phytochemicals at the cellular level. This approach has been instrumental in the initial stages of developing chemotherapeutic agents where human cancer cell lines are used as experimental models. These models have continued to contribute to elucidating specific requirements for certain biochemical events associated with proliferation, metabolism, loss of cell viability/apoptosis. Cell culture systems remain a promising tool in natural product development.

Keywords

Antioxidant activity; Reactive oxygen species; Medicinal plants; Cancer cell lines; Cytotoxicity

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