Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Prevalence, Phylogroups, Antimicrobial Susceptibility and GE-Netic Diversity of Escherichia coli Isolates From Food Products

Version 1 : Received: 14 August 2021 / Approved: 16 August 2021 / Online: 16 August 2021 (13:35:58 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Pakbin, B.; Allahyari, S.; Amani, Z.; Brück, W.M.; Mahmoudi, R.; Peymani, A. Prevalence, Phylogroups and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Products. Antibiotics 2021, 10, 1291. Pakbin, B.; Allahyari, S.; Amani, Z.; Brück, W.M.; Mahmoudi, R.; Peymani, A. Prevalence, Phylogroups and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Escherichia coli Isolates from Food Products. Antibiotics 2021, 10, 1291.

Journal reference: Antibiotics 2021, 10, 1291
DOI: 10.3390/antibiotics10111291

Abstract

The emergence of multi-drug resistant E. coli is an important matter of increasing considerable concern to global public health. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence, antibiotic resistance pattern, phylogroups and genetic variation of E. coli isolates from raw milk, vegetable salad and ground meat samples. Methods: Culture-based techniques, Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility testing, PCR and RAPD assays were used to determine the incidence rate, antimicrobial resistance pattern, phylogenetic groups and genetic diversity of the E. coli isolates. Results: E. coli isolates were highly resistant to amoxicillin (79.16%), trime-thoprim-sulfamethoxazole (70.83%), amoxicillin-clavulanic acid (62.50%), tetracycline (54.16%), chloramphenicol (54.16%), nitrofurantoin (54.16%), ampicillin (45.83%), streptomycin (45.83%), and kanamycin (33.33%); and completely susceptible to norfloxacin and azithromycin. 70.83% of the isolates were multi-drug resistant. Most E. coli isolates (46%) belonged to phylogroup A. RAPD with UBC245 primer categorized the isolates into 11 clusters. A high level of genetic di-versity was found among the isolates; however, 33.3% of the isolates were grouped in a major cluster (R5). Conclusions: Antibiotic resistance patterns are randomly distributed among the ge-netic clusters. Novel, practical, efficient food safety control and surveillance systems of multi-drug resistant foodborne pathogens are required to control the foodborne pathogen contamina-tion.

Keywords

Escherichia coli; Antimicrobial resistance; Food samples; Phylogenetic group; Genetic diversity

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Microbiology

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