Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Incidence of Malaria in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: A Single-Institution Retrospective Review from 2005 to 2020

Version 1 : Received: 2 August 2021 / Approved: 4 August 2021 / Online: 4 August 2021 (12:02:44 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Dian, N.D.; Mohd Salleh, A.F.; Rahim, M.A.F.A.; Munajat, M.B.; Abd Manap, S.N.A.; Ghazali, N.; Hassan, N.W.; Idris, Z.M. Malaria Cases in a Tertiary Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: A 16-Year (2005–2020) Retrospective Review. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6, 177. Dian, N.D.; Mohd Salleh, A.F.; Rahim, M.A.F.A.; Munajat, M.B.; Abd Manap, S.N.A.; Ghazali, N.; Hassan, N.W.; Idris, Z.M. Malaria Cases in a Tertiary Hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia: A 16-Year (2005–2020) Retrospective Review. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6, 177.

Journal reference: Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2021, 6, 177
DOI: 10.3390/tropicalmed6040177

Abstract

While there has been a tremendous decline in malaria disease burden in the remote parts of the Malaysia, little is known about malaria incidence in its urban localities. This study aimed to analyse trends of malaria cases in urban Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. All suspected cases presented to a university hospital in Kuala Lumpur from January 2005 to December 2020 were examined by microscopy. Infection status was analysed using descriptive statistics and curve estimation analysis. Of 3105 blood films examined, 92 (3%) were microscopically confirmed malaria cases. Plasmodium vivax infections accounted for the majority (36.9%) of all malaria cases. Nearly half (47.8%) of cases were found among foreign cases (P<0.001). The majority of foreign cases were males (86.4%) and came from Southeast Asian countries (65.9%). Curve estimation analysis showed significant decreases of malaria cases due to P. vivax (R2 = 0.598; P<0.001) and Plasmodium falciparum (R2 = 0.0259, P = 0.029), but increase for Plasmodium knowlesi (R2 = 0.325, P = 0.021) during the 16 years. This study revealed that malaria incidence in urban Kuala Lumpur is low and has remained stable since 2005. However, P. knowlesi played a significant role in the increase of overall malaria in the area, highlighting the importance of continued vigilance and improved surveillance.

Keywords

malaria; Plasmodium knowlesi; trends; retrospective; incidence; Malaysia

Subject

LIFE SCIENCES, Other

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.

We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.