Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Tree Resin as the Most Macroergic Constituent of Conifers – A Possible Means to Mitigate Global Warming and Climate Change

Version 1 : Received: 3 August 2021 / Approved: 4 August 2021 / Online: 4 August 2021 (11:24:26 CEST)

How to cite: Demko, J.; Machava, J. Tree Resin as the Most Macroergic Constituent of Conifers – A Possible Means to Mitigate Global Warming and Climate Change. Preprints 2021, 2021080107 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0107.v1). Demko, J.; Machava, J. Tree Resin as the Most Macroergic Constituent of Conifers – A Possible Means to Mitigate Global Warming and Climate Change. Preprints 2021, 2021080107 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202108.0107.v1).

Abstract

Tree resin, which in addition to its widespread use in industry is also a macroergic component which has not yet been used for energy purposes. The main goal of this work is to determine the energy content of the resin of spruce, pine and larch and wood components – pulp and turpentine. The combustion heats of resin (MJ/kg) from each timber was determined calorimetrically. The energy values of tree resin (>38.0 MJ.kg-1) were 2.2 and 2.4 times higher than that of bleached and unbleached cellulose, the highest value was recorded for the turpentine (>39.0 MJ.kg-1). The best way of resin tapping is the America method, providing 5 kg resin ha-1 yr-1. The resin quantity tapped was raised at least 3 times applying stimulant, its production cost compared to other feedstocks was the cheapest. The tree resin can be applied as a good means to mitigate global warming and consequently dampen climate change. One tonne of tree resin burned instead of coal spares the atmosphere by 5.0 Mt CO2 since it is environmentally neutral. As resin heating values approach to the lower end of ones of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, greater efforts are needed to examine the most efficient energy use of resin.

Keywords

resin; soft- and hardwood; combustion heat; pulp; renewable source; carbon sequestration; climate change

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