Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Maximum Possible Colling Rate in Ultrafast Chip Nanocalorimetry: Fundamental Limitations Due to Thermal Resistance at the Membrane/Gas Interface

Version 1 : Received: 30 July 2021 / Approved: 2 August 2021 / Online: 2 August 2021 (13:08:06 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Minakov, A.A.; Schick, C. Maximum Possible Cooling Rate in Ultrafast Chip Nanocalorimetry: Fundamental Limitations Due to Thermal Resistance at the Membrane/Gas Interface. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 8224. Minakov, A.A.; Schick, C. Maximum Possible Cooling Rate in Ultrafast Chip Nanocalorimetry: Fundamental Limitations Due to Thermal Resistance at the Membrane/Gas Interface. Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 8224.

Journal reference: Appl. Sci. 2021, 11, 8224
DOI: 10.3390/app11178224

Abstract

Ultrafast chip nanocalorimetry opens up remarkable possibilities in materials science by allowing samples to be cooled and heated at extremely high rates. Due to heat transfer limitations, controlled ultrafast cooling and heating can only be achieved for tiny samples in calorimeters with a micron-thick membrane. Even if ultrafast heating can be controlled under quasi-adiabatic conditions, ultrafast controlled cooling can be performed if the calorimetric cell is located in a heat-conducting gas. It was found that the maximum possible cooling rate increases as 1/r0 with decreasing radius r0 of the hot zone of the membrane. The possibility of increasing the maximum cooling rate with decreasing r0 was successfully implemented in many experiments. In this regard, it is interesting to answer the question: what is the maximum possible cooling rate in such experiments if r0 tends to zero? Indeed, on submicron scales, the mean free path of gas molecules lmfp becomes comparable to r0, and the temperature jump that exists at the membrane/gas interface becomes significant. Considering the limitation associated with thermal resistance at the membrane/gas interface and considering the transfer of heat through the membrane, we show that the controlled cooling rate can reach billions of K/s, up to 1010 K/s.

Keywords

chip-nanocalorimetry; ultrafast nanocalorimetry; interfacial thermal resistance

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.