Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Culture Growth of the Cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. in Various Salinity and Light Regimes and Their Influence on Its Phycocyanin and Other Pigments Content

Version 1 : Received: 16 July 2021 / Approved: 20 July 2021 / Online: 20 July 2021 (11:35:05 CEST)

How to cite: Hotos, G. Culture Growth of the Cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. in Various Salinity and Light Regimes and Their Influence on Its Phycocyanin and Other Pigments Content. Preprints 2021, 2021070444 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0444.v1). Hotos, G. Culture Growth of the Cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. in Various Salinity and Light Regimes and Their Influence on Its Phycocyanin and Other Pigments Content. Preprints 2021, 2021070444 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0444.v1).

Abstract

A strain of the filamentous non N-fixing cyanobacterium Phormidium sp. isolated from the Messolonghi (W. Greece) saltworks, was cultured in the laboratory at 6 different combinations of salinity (20-40-60 ppt) and illumination (low-2000 lux and high-8000 lux). At salinities of 60 and 40 ppt and in high illumination (XL-8000 lux) the growth rate (μmax) presented the highest values (0.491 and 0.401 respectively) compared to the corresponding at 20 ppt (0.203). In general and at all salinities, the higher illumination (XL) gave the highest growth rates and shorter dublication time (tg) in comparison to the lower illumination (L). On the contrary, phycocyanin, phycoerythrin and allophycocyanin production was extremely increased in the lower illumination (L) in all salinities, from ~14fold at 40 and 60 ppt to 269fold at 20 ppt of those corresponding to higher illumination (XL). Similar analogies were also recorded for the other two billiproteins. Chlorophyll-a content was also higher in lower illumination at all salinities in contrast to total carotenoids that did not exhibit such a pattern. The high growth rate and high phycocyanin content along with the rapid sedimentation of its cultured biomass can set this marine Phormidium species as a promising canditate for mass culture.

Subject Areas

cyanobacteria; Phormidium; culture growth; light; salinity; phycocyanin; pigments

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.