Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Morphological And Ecogeographic Study Of The Diversity Of Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) In Ecuador

Version 1 : Received: 17 July 2021 / Approved: 19 July 2021 / Online: 19 July 2021 (15:59:12 CEST)

How to cite: Monteros-Altamirano, Á.-.; Tapia, C.-.; Paredes, N.-.; Alulema, V.; Tacán, M.; Roura, A.-.; Lima, L.-.; Sørensen, M.-. Morphological And Ecogeographic Study Of The Diversity Of Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) In Ecuador. Preprints 2021, 2021070422 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0422.v1). Monteros-Altamirano, Á.-.; Tapia, C.-.; Paredes, N.-.; Alulema, V.; Tacán, M.; Roura, A.-.; Lima, L.-.; Sørensen, M.-. Morphological And Ecogeographic Study Of The Diversity Of Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) In Ecuador. Preprints 2021, 2021070422 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0422.v1).

Abstract

Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is a crop of nutritional and economic importance worldwide, cultivated in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries including Ecuador, traditionally cultivated in its three continental regions: the Amazon, the Coast and in the valleys of the Sierra. The purpose of this study was to characterize 195 accessions from INIAP's Ecuadorian cassava collection through 1) morphological characterization with qualitative and quantitative descriptors; and 2) ecogeographic characterization to know the climatic, geophysical and edaphic conditions in which cassava grows and which environments are frequent or marginal for its cultivation. For the morphological characterization, 27 morphological descriptors were used (18 qualitative and nine quantitative), and for the ecogeographic characterization, 55 variables (41 climatic, two geophysical and 12 edaphic). As a result, four morphological groups and three ecogeographic groups were identified. In the research, morphological variability was evidenced, mainly in descriptors related to the leaf, stems and inflorescences. In addition, it was possible to identify accessions that can adapt to extreme conditions of drought and poor soils, which could be used for improvement.

Subject Areas

Variability; adaptation; GIS

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