Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Online vs. Face-to-Face Lecture Courses: Factors Impacting the Effectiveness of Online Learning

Version 1 : Received: 9 July 2021 / Approved: 13 July 2021 / Online: 13 July 2021 (11:57:22 CEST)

How to cite: Janmaimool, P.; Nunsunanon, S. Online vs. Face-to-Face Lecture Courses: Factors Impacting the Effectiveness of Online Learning. Preprints 2021, 2021070306 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0306.v1). Janmaimool, P.; Nunsunanon, S. Online vs. Face-to-Face Lecture Courses: Factors Impacting the Effectiveness of Online Learning. Preprints 2021, 2021070306 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0306.v1).

Abstract

During the COVID-19 outbreak, most university courses have been offered on online platforms. A sudden shift from face-to-face classroom learning to online formats could influence the learning effectiveness of classes. This study aims to investigate differences in the learning effectiveness of online and face-to-face lecture courses. It also explores factors that impact the effectiveness of online instruction. These factors include interactions among learners, interactions between learners and the instructor, the quality of online platforms, learners’ ability to use devices and follow instructions, and learners’ situational challenges. The study participants were 261 university students at King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi in Bangkok, Thailand. All participants were enrolled in at least one lecture course, such as history, humans and the environment, the environment and development, or general philosophy, during the 2019 academic year. A questionnaire was distributed to participants after they completed these courses in May 2020. Paired simple t-test analyses were used to compare the effectiveness of online and face-to-face classes, and a multiple regression analysis was used to identify factors that impact the learning effectiveness of online classes. The results show that online classes are less effective than face-to-face courses. The multiple regression analysis also revealed that the effectiveness of online learning was significantly impacted by learners’ ability to interact with classmates during class, their ability to interact with instructors after the class, the quality of online platforms, and disturbances or distractions in learners’ environments.

Subject Areas

online learning; face-to-face learning; learning effectiveness; challenges with online learning; lecture-based courses.

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