Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Interplay Between Canopy Structure and Topography and Its Impacts on Seasonal Variations in Surface Reflectance in the Boreal Region of Alaska – Implication for Surface Radiation Budget

Version 1 : Received: 28 June 2021 / Approved: 30 June 2021 / Online: 30 June 2021 (09:51:47 CEST)

How to cite: Nath, B.; Ni-Meister, W. Interplay Between Canopy Structure and Topography and Its Impacts on Seasonal Variations in Surface Reflectance in the Boreal Region of Alaska – Implication for Surface Radiation Budget. Preprints 2021, 2021060727 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0727.v1). Nath, B.; Ni-Meister, W. Interplay Between Canopy Structure and Topography and Its Impacts on Seasonal Variations in Surface Reflectance in the Boreal Region of Alaska – Implication for Surface Radiation Budget. Preprints 2021, 2021060727 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0727.v1).

Abstract

Forests are critical in regulating the world’s climate and they maintain overall Earth’s energy balance. The variability in forest canopy structure, topography and underneath vegetation background condition creates uncertainty in the estimation and modelling of Earth’s surface radiation particularly for boreal regions in high latitude. We studied seasonal variation in surface reflectance with respect to land cover classes, canopy structures, and topography in a boreal region of Alaska by fusing together Landsat 8 surface reflectance and LiDAR-derived canopy matrices. Our study shows that canopy structure and topography interplay and influence surface reflectance in a complex way particularly during the snow season. Topographic aspect and elevation control vegetation growth, type and structure. The southern slope is featured with more deciduous and taller trees having greater rugosity than the northern slope. Higher elevation is associated with taller trees for both vegetation types, particularly in the southern slope. In general, surface reflectance shows similar relationships with canopy cover, height and rugosity, mainly due to close relationships between these parameters. Surface reflectance decreases with canopy cover, tree height, and rugosity especially for evergreen forest. Deciduous forest shows larger variability of surface reflectance, particularly in March, mainly due to the mixing effect of snow and vegetation. The relationship between vegetation structure and surface reflectance is greatly impacted by topography. The negative relationship between elevation and surface reflectance may be due to taller and denser vegetation distribution in higher elevation. Surface reflectance in the southern slope is slightly larger than the northern slope for both deciduous and evergreen forest. The shadow effect from topography and tree crowns on surface reflectance play a different role for deciduous and evergreen forests. For deciduous forest, topographic shadow effect on surface reflectance is stronger than from tree shadowing in all seasons. For evergreen forest, shadow effects from topography and tree crowns on surface reflectance are both equally dominant, however tree shadow effect is more significant in March than in May and August. The generalized additive models (GAM) based on non-linear relationships between response (surface reflectance) and predictor (canopy structures and topography) variables confirms such observations. Our study not only provides accurate quantification of surface radiation budget but also helps in parametrization of climate change models.

Subject Areas

Boreal Forest; LiDAR; Landsat 8; Surface Reflectance; Alaska

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.