Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Drought: The Silent Harm of Migration From Central America During the Period 1990 to 2019

Version 1 : Received: 23 June 2021 / Approved: 25 June 2021 / Online: 25 June 2021 (09:23:22 CEST)

How to cite: Olivera, S.; Fuerte-Celis, M.D.P.; Bolaños, B. Drought: The Silent Harm of Migration From Central America During the Period 1990 to 2019. Preprints 2021, 2021060612 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0612.v1). Olivera, S.; Fuerte-Celis, M.D.P.; Bolaños, B. Drought: The Silent Harm of Migration From Central America During the Period 1990 to 2019. Preprints 2021, 2021060612 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0612.v1).

Abstract

The worldwide number of migrants has had a rapid increase during the last fifteen years. Despite the extensive research studies that elucidate the increase in migrants' recipient countries, we know little about the relationship between the climate factors and human mobility in the countries of origin. Hence, this study focuses on the effects of weather and the propensity of individuals to leave a territory by measuring the importance of rain precipitation or the lack of it in one of the critical food corridors of Central America, formed by El Salvador, Honduras, and Guatemala. To study the mobility process, we develop a stochastic frontier model; the main result shows a greater propensity to migrate when there is a significant drought event in the place of origin. Some other factors that motivate people to leave their homeland are the effect of other climate events measured through the control system (ENSO), homicide levels, economic performance, and exchange rate. The findings allow differentiating between drought and excess precipitation on a population and mobility to other territories. In addition, these results permit us to derive observable implications of the different effects of flooding and drought and create public policies of prevention, mitigation, and resilience.

Subject Areas

Migration; Northern Triangle of Central America; climate change; drought

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