Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and Prefrontal Cortex Activation

Version 1 : Received: 16 June 2021 / Approved: 17 June 2021 / Online: 17 June 2021 (08:21:49 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Auten, A.; Cavey, K.; Reed, J.; Dolgener, F.; Moriarty, T. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and Prefrontal Cortex Activation. Sci 2021, 3, 32. Auten, A.; Cavey, K.; Reed, J.; Dolgener, F.; Moriarty, T. Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Cycling Time Trial Performance and Prefrontal Cortex Activation. Sci 2021, 3, 32.

Journal reference: Sci 2021, 3, 32
DOI: 10.3390/sci3030032

Abstract

Background: Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a neuromodulatory technique that delivers low levels of a constant current via scalp electrodes to specifically targeted areas of the brain. The effects of tDCS on whole-body exercise performance has been of interest in recent literature. The purpose of the current investigation was to investigate if tDCS, administered via Halo Sport, influences time trial performance in trained cyclists, and if changes in exercise performance are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activation and/or muscle oxygenation (SmO2). Methods: Twelve recreationally trained cyclists volunteered to participate in two 10-kilometer time trials following 20 minutes of tDCS or a sham condition. Results: T-tests showed there was no significant difference in performance (time to completion) or physiological measures (BLa-, HR, SmO2, PFC oxygenation) between the Halo and sham conditions. Conclusions: These results indicate that the application of tDCS via Halo Sport does not induce changes in exercise performance or related physiological parameters during a 10-kilometer cycling time trial.

Keywords

tDCS; cycling time trial; exercise performance; prefrontal cortex; muscle oxygenation

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