Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Current Knowledge on the Background, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia – Literature Review.

Version 1 : Received: 15 June 2021 / Approved: 16 June 2021 / Online: 16 June 2021 (14:17:30 CEST)

How to cite: Hutny, M.J.; Hofman, J.M.; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, A.; Gorzkowska, A. Current Knowledge on the Background, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia – Literature Review.. Preprints 2021, 2021060448 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0448.v1). Hutny, M.J.; Hofman, J.M.; Klimkowicz-Mrowiec, A.; Gorzkowska, A. Current Knowledge on the Background, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Levodopa-Induced Dyskinesia – Literature Review.. Preprints 2021, 2021060448 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0448.v1).

Abstract

Levodopa remains the primary drug for controlling motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease through the whole course, but over time complications develop in the form of dyskinesias, which gradually become more frequent and severe. These abnormal, involuntary, hyperkinetic movements are mostly characteristic of the ON phase and reflect an excess of exogenous levodopa. They may also occur during OFF phase, or in both phases. Over the past 10 years, the issue of levodopa-induced dyskinesia has been the subject of research into both the substrate of this pathology and potential remedial strategies. The purpose of the present study was to review the results of recent research on the background and treatment of dyskinesia. To this end, databases were reviewed using a search strategy that included both relevant keywords related to the topic and appropriate filters to limit results to English-language literature published since 2010. Based on the selected papers, the current state of knowledge on morphological, functional, genetic, and clinical features of levodopa-induced dyskinesia, as well as pharmacological, genetic treatment and other therapies such as deep brain stimulation are described.

Keywords

Parkinson’s disease; abnormal involuntary movements; dopaminergic signaling; basal ganglia; spiny projection neurons; neurotransmission; deep brain stimulation

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