Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Implications of Health, Safety and Environmental Conditions on Artisanal Goldminers’ Self-protection at Work in Ghana

Version 1 : Received: 8 June 2021 / Approved: 9 June 2021 / Online: 9 June 2021 (08:55:06 CEST)

How to cite: Aram, S.A.; Saalidong, B.M.; Appiah, A. Implications of Health, Safety and Environmental Conditions on Artisanal Goldminers’ Self-protection at Work in Ghana. Preprints 2021, 2021060247 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0247.v1). Aram, S.A.; Saalidong, B.M.; Appiah, A. Implications of Health, Safety and Environmental Conditions on Artisanal Goldminers’ Self-protection at Work in Ghana. Preprints 2021, 2021060247 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202106.0247.v1).

Abstract

The nature of Artisanal mining in Ghana exposes its workers to various levels of health, safety and environmental (HSE) threats. These miners are mostly liable for their own HSE state at work. In an attempt to understand the HSE dynamics of artisanal miners, this study sought to assess the effect of HSE conditions on self-protection at work by artisanal goldminers in Ghana. A nested binary logistic regression model was fitted to a cross sectional survey of 500 artisanal goldminers while controlling for compositional and contextual factors. Of the HSE conditions, only health (OR= 1.653, p<0.001) and safety conditions (OR= 1.935, p<0.001) were robust in predicting self-protection in all three models. Goldminers who reported good health and safety conditions were more likely to fully protect themselves at work as compared to their counterparts who reported poor health and safety conditions. For compositional factors, female goldminers were 84% less likely to protect themselves. Miners who had senior high (OR= 1.759, p<0.001) or tertiary education (OR= 1.875, p<0.001) were more likely to protect themselves at work as compared to those with no formal education. Likewise, miners who undertook routine medical checkups (OR= 2.533, p<0.001) and the most experienced miners (OR= 2.734, p<0.001) were more likely to protect themselves at work. Counterintuitively, miners who earned more monthly income ($174 and above) were less likely to protect themselves. At the contextual level, miners who worked in non-production departments (OR= 2.001, p<0.001) and miners who worked in the medium scale subsector (OR= 5.311, p<0.001) were more likely to protect themselves at work. To increase consciousness of self-protection in artisanal mining, there is the need for a national dialogue on how to improve HSE conditions and in the absence of legislation, the complexities in managing HSE in the sector needs to be decoupled to achieve fair and standard HSE conditions as championed by the World Health Organization.

Subject Areas

Artisanal mining; Environment; Goldmining; Health; Safety; Self-protection

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