Preprint Case Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Acute Pericarditis after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Case Report

Version 1 : Received: 7 May 2021 / Approved: 10 May 2021 / Online: 10 May 2021 (15:48:46 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Rodevič, G.; Budrys, P.; Davidavičius, G. Acute Pericarditis after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Case Report. Medicina 2021, 57, 490. Rodevič, G.; Budrys, P.; Davidavičius, G. Acute Pericarditis after Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A Case Report. Medicina 2021, 57, 490.

Journal reference: Medicina 2021, 57, 490
DOI: 10.3390/medicina57050490

Abstract

Background: Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is known as a very rare possible trigger of pericarditis. Most frequently it develops after a latent period or early in case of periprocedural complications. In this report, we present an atypical early onset of pericarditis after the uncomplicated PCI. Case Summary: A 58-year-old man was admitted to the hospital for the PCI of the chronic total occlusion of left anterior descending (LAD) artery. An initial electrocardiogram (ECG) was unremarkable. PCI attempt was unsuccessful. There were no procedure related complications observed at the end of PCI attempt and patient was symptom free. Six hours after interventional procedure the patient complained of severe chest pain. The ECG demonstrated ST-segment elevation in anterior and lateral leads. Troponin I was mildly elevated but coronary angiogram did not reveal impairment of collateral blood flow to the LAD territory. Because of pericarditic chest pain, typical ECG findings and pericardial effusion with elevated C-reactive protein, the diagnosis of acute pericarditis was established, and a course of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) was initiated. Chest pain was relieved and ST-segment elevation almost completely returned to baseline after three days of treatment. The patient was discharged in stable condition without chest pain on the fourth day after symptom onset. Conclusions: Acute pericarditis is a rare complication of PCI. Despite the lack of specific clinical manifestation, post-traumatic pericarditis should be considered in patients with symptoms and signs of pericarditis and a prior history of iatrogenic injury or thoracic trauma.

Keywords

Post-cardiac injury syndrome; pericarditis; percutaneous coronary intervention.

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