Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

A Checklist of Indigenous Ichthyofauna in the Dhanu River and Surrounding Wetlands of Bangladesh: Current Status, Population Trends and Threats

Version 1 : Received: 24 April 2021 / Approved: 26 April 2021 / Online: 26 April 2021 (12:06:18 CEST)

How to cite: Pandit, D.; Saha, S.; Kunda, M.; Harun-Al-Rashid, A. A Checklist of Indigenous Ichthyofauna in the Dhanu River and Surrounding Wetlands of Bangladesh: Current Status, Population Trends and Threats. Preprints 2021, 2021040659 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0659.v1). Pandit, D.; Saha, S.; Kunda, M.; Harun-Al-Rashid, A. A Checklist of Indigenous Ichthyofauna in the Dhanu River and Surrounding Wetlands of Bangladesh: Current Status, Population Trends and Threats. Preprints 2021, 2021040659 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0659.v1).

Abstract

This study was conducted in the Dhanu River and adjacent waters at Mithamain upazila (sub-district) under Kishoreganj district of Bangladesh to prepare a check list of available native fishes with their availability status, conservation perspectives, habitat preferences, population trends and intimidations. Data were collected monthly by direct field survey, focus group discussions, and personal interviews with fishers by using a semi-structured questionnaire and a pictorial check list of fish species. A total of 91 indigenous fish species of 59 genera belonging to 29 families under 11 orders were documented where 17.58% species was abundantly available, 27.47% was commonly available, 31.87% was moderately available and 23.08% was rarely available. Cypriniformes was found as the dominant order, consisting 37.36% of the fish species aggregation and Cyprinidae was the most dominant family with 32.97% of the entire species assemblage. Twenty four piscine species (26.37%) were under threatened category in Bangladesh which subsumed 3 critically endangered (3.29%), 11 endangered (12.08%), and 10 vulnerable species (10.99%). Notably globally threatened Cirrhinus cirrhosus, Channa orientalis, and Wallago attu were available there. Fish population trends of 24.18% and 59.34% of the entire fish species was found in decreasing trends in global and national level, respectively. Leading intimidation to the fish diversity was indiscriminately overfishing, followed by fishing by dewatering of wetlands, katha fishing method, use of deprecated fishing gears, climate change, etc. Minimization of anthropogenic impacts, assuring the flux of water round the year, enactments of fish laws, installation and management of fish sanctuaries, and raising public awareness can be effective for the conservation of existing fisheries resources.

Subject Areas

Beel, conservation, fish diversity, IUCN, native fishes

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