Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Adolescents, Ambivalent Sexism and Social Networks, A Conditioning Factor in the Healthcare of Women

Version 1 : Received: 21 April 2021 / Approved: 23 April 2021 / Online: 23 April 2021 (10:01:04 CEST)

How to cite: Gil Bermejo, J.L.; Martos Sanchez, C.; Vazquez Aguado, O.; García Navarro, E.B. Adolescents, Ambivalent Sexism and Social Networks, A Conditioning Factor in the Healthcare of Women. Preprints 2021, 2021040626 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0626.v1). Gil Bermejo, J.L.; Martos Sanchez, C.; Vazquez Aguado, O.; García Navarro, E.B. Adolescents, Ambivalent Sexism and Social Networks, A Conditioning Factor in the Healthcare of Women. Preprints 2021, 2021040626 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0626.v1).

Abstract

Despite gender equality being present in the social and political sphere, we still encounter aspects that are characteristic of sexism. Such aspects impact upon gender inequality and different types of violence towards women. The present article aims to examine the behaviour of adolescents from Huelva with regards to ambivalent sexism towards women on social networks and their influence on health. Further, we seek to uncover adolescent’s perceptions with regards to gender differences in the use of social networks, the relationship between sexism and women's emotional well-being was observed. The study sample was formed by young people aged between 14 and 16 years who were residing in rural and urban zones in the south of Spain. A mixed methods approach was taken. At a quantitative level, a sample of 400 young people was recruited. These were administered a questionnaire about sexism which was composed of two scales and has been validated at a national and international level. At a qualitative level, the study counted on 33 young people who participated in in-depth discussions via interviews and discussion groups. The results showed that sexism emerges in adolescence in the analysed sample from the south of Spain. This favoured a digital gender gap and was reinforced through social networks such as Instagram and Snapchat. Rising awareness and a critical view of the aforementioned sexism was shown on the behalf of females, particularly those from urban backgrounds.

Subject Areas

Sexism; social networks; adolescence; digital gender gap, emotional well-being

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