Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

How Collective Intelligent Decisions in Public Policymaking are Made: Case Study of Participatory Budgeting in Kraków

Version 1 : Received: 14 April 2021 / Approved: 15 April 2021 / Online: 15 April 2021 (15:10:12 CEST)

How to cite: Olszowski, R. How Collective Intelligent Decisions in Public Policymaking are Made: Case Study of Participatory Budgeting in Kraków. Preprints 2021, 2021040422 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0422.v1). Olszowski, R. How Collective Intelligent Decisions in Public Policymaking are Made: Case Study of Participatory Budgeting in Kraków. Preprints 2021, 2021040422 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0422.v1).

Abstract

In open, sustainable policymaking, we are expecting to develop the valuable results that will bring us closer to a fairer and more balanced society. One way to involve the public in these processes is to engage them in online e-participation projects. Despite the hopes, empirical analyses show that many e-participation initiatives have failed to deliver expected benefits. Revealing what actually works in examined projects and what requires improvement would allow for better policy planning in the future. In this article, I made an attempt to identify and assess the cognitive processes enabling emergence of collective intelligence (CI) in a singular e-participation project. For this reason, I worked out and tested an evaluation technique, combining the MILCS framework for group cognition and the results of empirical research on CI. A case study method based on semi-structured interviews was selected to evaluate a sample participatory budgeting initiative, Civic Budget of the City of Kraków. Results reveal that most cognitive processes are working satisfactorily, but the real problem is using collective memory, which works only to a very limited extent. A guideline for future policymakers should be to develop a shared memory system, to which all community members should have access.

Subject Areas

collective intelligence; policymaking; public policy; e-participation; participatory budgeting; cognitive systems; group cognition.

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