Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Understanding the Current Complexities of Indigenous Land Tenure and Toponymy: The Importance of Historical Indigenous Cartography with Indigenous Contributions to Euro/American/Canadian Cartography

Version 1 : Received: 13 April 2021 / Approved: 14 April 2021 / Online: 14 April 2021 (17:51:47 CEST)

How to cite: Cole, D.G.G.; Hart, A.E.R. Understanding the Current Complexities of Indigenous Land Tenure and Toponymy: The Importance of Historical Indigenous Cartography with Indigenous Contributions to Euro/American/Canadian Cartography. Preprints 2021, 2021040396 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0396.v1). Cole, D.G.G.; Hart, A.E.R. Understanding the Current Complexities of Indigenous Land Tenure and Toponymy: The Importance of Historical Indigenous Cartography with Indigenous Contributions to Euro/American/Canadian Cartography. Preprints 2021, 2021040396 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202104.0396.v1).

Abstract

In recent years, many libraries and archives have started digitizing their collections thus making maps by Indigenous peoples more easily available for scholars to study. While a number of these maps were discussed by G. Malcolm Lewis in the History of Cartography series (volume 2, book 3, Chapter 4: 1984), more have since been found and disseminated. These maps are critical in understanding the historic and current land tenure of Indigenous groups. Further, Indigenous claims to land can be seen in their connections via toponymy. European concepts of territory and political boundaries did not coincide with First Nation/American Indian views resulting in the mistaken view that Natives did not have formal concepts of their territories. Further, Tribes/First Nations with cross-border territory have special jurisdictional problems. This paper will illustrate how many Native residents were very spatially cognizant of their own lands, as well as neighboring nations’ lands, overlaps between groups, hunting territories, populations, and trade networks. Currently, the Sinixt First Nation provides a perfect example of how an Aboriginal people are inputting and using a GIS representation of their territory with proper toponymy and use areas.

Subject Areas

Indigenous; toponomy; land tenure; cartography

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.