Working Paper Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Influence of Grain Legume and Tillage Strategies on CO2 and N2O Gas Exchange Under Varied Environmental Conditions

Version 1 : Received: 24 March 2021 / Approved: 25 March 2021 / Online: 25 March 2021 (14:42:07 CET)

How to cite: Hansen, E.M.Ø.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Justes, E.; Ambus, P.; Mikkelsen, T.N. The Influence of Grain Legume and Tillage Strategies on CO2 and N2O Gas Exchange Under Varied Environmental Conditions. Preprints 2021, 2021030627 Hansen, E.M.Ø.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, H.; Justes, E.; Ambus, P.; Mikkelsen, T.N. The Influence of Grain Legume and Tillage Strategies on CO2 and N2O Gas Exchange Under Varied Environmental Conditions. Preprints 2021, 2021030627

Abstract

Atmospheric CO2 concentration, temperature and precipitation escalate and it is critical to investigate the agricultural practices best suited to face such new conditions. An important aspect is soil management, which alters soil organic matter content, nutrients and structure, and thus soil/atmosphere interactions and ultimately production. This in vitro study addresses greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from two long-term soil management experiments in France. One set of soil columns were managed with either grain legume + cover crops or no grain legumes + bare fallow. The other with either plowed or reduced tillage soils. GHG exchange (CO2, N2O) measurements was conducted under different environmental conditions, before and during growth of barley and eventually with three levels of barley biomass cuts (everything removed, cut halfway, intact). The gas exchange was influenced by time and environmental settings, and to a smaller degree management history, with highly variable emissions of N2O. The environmental treatments induced different patterns of effect depending on the management history of the soils. The gas exchange from soil with grain legume was more responsive to the environmental treatments than the rotation without grain legumes. Depending on the history of tillage, the gas exchange responded likewise differently to the induced environment.

Subject Areas

Net ecosystem exchange; Gross ecosystem production; Mesocosm; Rotation; Tillage

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