Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Safety Analysis of Young Pedestrian Behavior at Signalized Intersections: An Eye-Tracking Study

Version 1 : Received: 15 March 2021 / Approved: 16 March 2021 / Online: 16 March 2021 (09:23:11 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Gruden, C.; Ištoka Otković, I.; Šraml, M. Safety Analysis of Young Pedestrian Behavior at Signalized Intersections: An Eye-tracking Study. Sustainability 2021, 13, 4419. Gruden, C.; Ištoka Otković, I.; Šraml, M. Safety Analysis of Young Pedestrian Behavior at Signalized Intersections: An Eye-tracking Study. Sustainability 2021, 13, 4419.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2021, 13, 4419
DOI: 10.3390/su13084419

Abstract

Smartphones have become an integral part of our everyday lives and keep us busy while doing other primary activities such as driving, cycling or walking in traffic. The problem of digital distraction among drivers has been largely addressed, and interest is growing also on vulnerable road users as well: In fact, high percentages of pedestrians and cyclists are accustomed to checking their devices while moving in traffic. This research links to the presented theme and aims to investigate the extent to which digital distraction in the form of social media app checking influences pedestrian behavior. The focus of the study is specifically on signalized intersections. An outdoor, eye-tracking experiment was conducted on a specific route consisting of various elements typical of urban areas. Participants were asked to walk the predefined route twice, en-countering three signalized intersections: the first time they were asked to walk with their smartphone in hand, the second time without. The recordings of each participant's route were then analyzed, examining reaction time, crossing time and speed, fixations, and gaze paths. The results show a clear impact of digital devices on pedestrians' attention by increasing their reaction and crossing times and decreasing crossing speeds. In addition, the analysis of fixations found that 82.54% of the time was devoted to the smartphone, while interest in other street ele-ments decreased from 16.64% to 4.03%.

Subject Areas

Eye-tracking; distraction; pedestrian behavior; glance behavior; reaction time; signalized crossings.

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