Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

What Affects Maternal Response to Measles Vaccinations? Examining the Health Beliefs Model (HBM)

Version 1 : Received: 22 February 2021 / Approved: 23 February 2021 / Online: 23 February 2021 (09:29:59 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Grinberg, K.; Sela, Y. What Affects Maternal Response to Measles Vaccinations? Examining the Health Beliefs Model (HBM). Sci 2021, 3, 20. Grinberg, K.; Sela, Y. What Affects Maternal Response to Measles Vaccinations? Examining the Health Beliefs Model (HBM). Sci 2021, 3, 20.

Journal reference: Sci 2021, 3, 20
DOI: 10.3390/sci3020020

Abstract

Background: Renewed measles outbreaks in recent years indicate that despite the routine availability of vaccines for a disease that is considered contagious, dangerous and deadly, many anti-vaccinationists do not vaccinate their children, which consequently endangers public health. This study aimed to investigate the factors that influence mothers to vaccinate their children, and whether the Health Belief Model (HBM) could predict compliance or non-compliance. Methods: This was a quantitative correlational research, utilizing a 40-item questionnaire administered to 181 mothers in Israel. Results: The findings indicated two main factors that affected mothers' intention to vaccinate their children against measles: first, their perception of the vaccine's advantages, and second, their perception of the severity of the disease. It was also found that the HBM variables significantly affected the intention to administer vaccines. Conclusion: Consequently, raising public awareness of the vaccine's advantages and importance to preventing mass infection, as well as attempts by the health system and practitioners to understand the motivations of anti-vaccinationists (including health beliefs and cultural sensitivities) could significantly increase the percentage of vaccinated children, and eradicate the measles epidemic.

Keywords

Measles vaccine; intention; perception; maternal; Health Belief Model (HBM)

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