Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Making Decision-Making Visible- Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions

Version 1 : Received: 6 February 2021 / Approved: 8 February 2021 / Online: 8 February 2021 (10:35:52 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Benfield, A.; Krueger, R.B. Making Decision-Making Visible—Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3635. Benfield, A.; Krueger, R.B. Making Decision-Making Visible—Teaching the Process of Evaluating Interventions. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3635.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 3635
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18073635

Abstract

Significant efforts in the past decades to teach evidence-based practice (EBP) implementation has emphasized increasing knowledge of EBP and developing interventions to support adoption to practice. These efforts have resulted in only limited sustained improvements in the daily use of evidence-based interventions in clinical practice in most health professions. Many new interven-tions with limited evidence of effectiveness are readily adopted each year - indicating openness to change is not the problem. The selection of an intervention is the outcome of an elaborate and complex cognitive process which is shaped by how they represent the problem in their mind and is mostly invisible processes to others. Therefore, the complex thinking process which support appropriate adoption of interventions should be taught more explicitly. Making the process visible to clinicians increases the acquisition of the skills required to judiciously select one in-tervention over others. The purpose of this paper is to provide a review of the selection process and the critical analysis that is required to appropriately decide to trial or not trial new intervention strategies with patients.

Keywords

evidence-based practice; clinical reasoning; causal model; intervention theory; Concept Mapping

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.