Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Carbon Dioxide Pretreatment on Tomatoes Before Cold Storage Synergistically Delays Ripening Through Transcriptional Change of Ethylene-Related Genes and Respiration-Related Metabolisms

Version 1 : Received: 1 February 2021 / Approved: 2 February 2021 / Online: 2 February 2021 (14:26:34 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Park, M.-H.; Kim, S.-J.; Lee, J.-S.; Hong, Y.-P.; Chae, S.-H.; Ku, K.-M. Carbon Dioxide Pretreatment and Cold Storage Synergistically Delay Tomato Ripening through Transcriptional Change in Ethylene-Related Genes and Respiration-Related Metabolism. Foods 2021, 10, 744. Park, M.-H.; Kim, S.-J.; Lee, J.-S.; Hong, Y.-P.; Chae, S.-H.; Ku, K.-M. Carbon Dioxide Pretreatment and Cold Storage Synergistically Delay Tomato Ripening through Transcriptional Change in Ethylene-Related Genes and Respiration-Related Metabolism. Foods 2021, 10, 744.

Journal reference: Foods 2021, 10, 744
DOI: 10.3390/foods10040744

Abstract

The effect of CO2 pre-treatments on tomato quality prior to cold storage was investigated using physiochemical and transcriptome changes. Three hours CO2 treated fruits were firmer than untreated fruits and had a good appearance even after being transferred from 4°C storage to 20°C for 8 d. CO2 pretreatment with cold storage showed a synergistic effect on delayed ripening through reduced respiration; these tomatoes exhibited a lower lycopene content than untreated fruit under cold storage. Tomatoes treated with 30% CO2 had fewer pits than untreated fruits subjected to chilling temperatures, even after being transferred to 20°C for 8 d. Functional enrichment analyses from transcriptome and metabolome commonly showed that CO2-responsive genes or metabolites were involved in the sucrose and starch and biosynthesis of secondary metabolisms. The most frequently detected domain, ethylene-responsive factor domain and reduced glycolysis provide insights into the mechanism that CO2 regulates tomato quality.

Subject Areas

Carbon dioxide; Chilling injury; Ethylene response factor; Ripening; Tomato

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