Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Investigating Primary Cilia during Peripheral Nervous System Formation

Version 1 : Received: 31 January 2021 / Approved: 1 February 2021 / Online: 1 February 2021 (13:26:06 CET)

How to cite: Yusifov, E.; Dumoulin, A.; Stoeckli, E.T. Investigating Primary Cilia during Peripheral Nervous System Formation. Preprints 2021, 2021020031 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0031.v1). Yusifov, E.; Dumoulin, A.; Stoeckli, E.T. Investigating Primary Cilia during Peripheral Nervous System Formation. Preprints 2021, 2021020031 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202102.0031.v1).

Abstract

The primary cilium plays a pivotal role during embryonic development of vertebrates. It acts as a somatic signaling hub for specific pathways, such as sonic hedgehog signaling. In humans, mutations in genes that cause dysregulation of ciliogenesis or ciliary function lead to severe developmental disorders called ciliopathies. Beyond its obvious role in early morphogenesis, growing evidence points towards an essential function of the primary cilium in neural circuit formation in the central nervous system. However, very little is known about a potential role in the formation of the peripheral nervous system. Here, we investigated the presence of the primary cilium in neural crest cells and their derivatives in the trunk of the developing chicken embryo in vivo. We found that neural crest cells, sensory neurons, and boundary cap cells all bear a primary cilium during key stages of early peripheral nervous system formation. Moreover, we described differences in the ciliation of neuronal cultures of different populations from the peripheral and central nervous system. Our results offer a framework for further in vivo and in vitro investigations on specific roles that the primary cilium might play during peripheral nervous system formation.

Subject Areas

primary cilium; ciliogenesis; neural circuits formation; neural crest cells; DRG; boundary cap cells; sympathetic ganglia; PNS

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