Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Repetition is Important to Students and Their Understanding During Laboratory Courses that Include Research

Version 1 : Received: 22 January 2021 / Approved: 26 January 2021 / Online: 26 January 2021 (11:37:54 CET)

How to cite: Wiggins, B.; Lily, L.; Sefi-Cyr, H.; Dahlberg, C. Repetition is Important to Students and Their Understanding During Laboratory Courses that Include Research. Preprints 2021, 2021010536 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0536.v1). Wiggins, B.; Lily, L.; Sefi-Cyr, H.; Dahlberg, C. Repetition is Important to Students and Their Understanding During Laboratory Courses that Include Research. Preprints 2021, 2021010536 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0536.v1).

Abstract

Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) provide students with opportunities for the same gains that apprenticed research with faculty members offer. As their popularity increases, it is important that critical elements of CUREs are supported by thoughtful design. Student experiences in CUREs can provide important insights into why CUREs are so effective. We present evidence from students who participated in CUREs at the introductory, intermediate, and advanced levels, as well as from graduate teaching assistants for an introductory lab course that included a CURE. Students and teaching assistants describe repetition as a valuable element in CUREs and other laboratory experiences. We used student work and open-ended interviews to identify which of five previously described elements of CUREs students found important. Because repetition was particularly salient, we characterized how students described repetition as they experienced it in courses that contained full-length or “micro”-CUREs. In prompted interviews, students described how repetition in CUREs provided cognitive (learning concepts) and practical (learning technical skills) value. Recent graduates who had participated in CUREs at each level of their Biology education were particularly aware that they placed value in repetition and acknowledged it as motivational in their own learning. Many students described repetition in metacognitive terms, which also suggests that as students advance through laboratory and CURE curricula, their understanding of how repetition supports their learning becomes more sophisticated. Finally, we integrated student descriptions to suggest ways in which repetition can be designed into CUREs or other laboratory courses to support scientific learning and enhance students’ sense of scientific identity.

Subject Areas

Course-based undergraduate research experience (CURE); repetition; iteration

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