Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

South East Asia’s Megalodon Shark First Record and Habitat Preference Modeling During Miocene Period (20 Ma) and Winter Monsoon Impacts in South Coast of West Java

Version 1 : Received: 21 January 2021 / Approved: 25 January 2021 / Online: 25 January 2021 (15:05:04 CET)

How to cite: Wibowo, A. South East Asia’s Megalodon Shark First Record and Habitat Preference Modeling During Miocene Period (20 Ma) and Winter Monsoon Impacts in South Coast of West Java. Preprints 2021, 2021010509 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0509.v1). Wibowo, A. South East Asia’s Megalodon Shark First Record and Habitat Preference Modeling During Miocene Period (20 Ma) and Winter Monsoon Impacts in South Coast of West Java. Preprints 2021, 2021010509 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0509.v1).

Abstract

Otodus megalodon is known as the biggest shark ever alive and recent records show this species was only existed in America, Africa and Europe continents in the last Miocene period 20 million years ago (Ma). Recently, megalodon teeth have been discovered in South coast of West Java. Here this study aims to present and model the presence of O. megalodon. The length of the excavated tooth was ranging from 13 to 19 cm. The lithological analysis shows that the tooth was found in Miocene rock layers. Paleogeographic model shows that during Miocene southern parts of Java island were submerged including the recent locations where the megalodon tooth have been found. Half parts of the modeled West Java were an ocean with depth ranging from 0 to 200 m. High habitat use preferences by juvenile megalodon were estimated in the shelf (depth 0-40 m) with the size of 1365 km2 . Whereas habitat use preference by adult megalodon was low at this depth. Both juvenile and adult habitat use frequencies were low at a depth of between 80 m and 160 m. Habitat use preferences were increasing at a depth of > 200 m. After Miocene, the paleoclimate records show a decline in temperature and lead to the decline of whale population in ocean. The declining of megalodon’s prey explains the declining of this giant shark especially in post Miocene and early Pliocene periods.

Subject Areas

Habitat use; model; megalodon; Java; shark

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