Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Psychological Distress and Well-Being Among Students of Health Disciplines: The Importance of Academic Satisfaction

Version 1 : Received: 14 January 2021 / Approved: 15 January 2021 / Online: 15 January 2021 (12:18:32 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Franzen, J.; Jermann, F.; Ghisletta, P.; Rudaz, S.; Bondolfi, G.; Tran, N.T. Psychological Distress and Well-Being among Students of Health Disciplines: The Importance of Academic Satisfaction. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2151. Franzen, J.; Jermann, F.; Ghisletta, P.; Rudaz, S.; Bondolfi, G.; Tran, N.T. Psychological Distress and Well-Being among Students of Health Disciplines: The Importance of Academic Satisfaction. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2151.

Journal reference: Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18, 2151
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph18042151

Abstract

Background Research on the mental health of students in health disciplines mainly focuses on psychological distress and nursing and medical students. This study aimed to investigate the psychological well-being and distress and related factors among undergraduate students training in eight different health-related tracks in Geneva, Switzerland. Methods This cross-sectional study used established self-filled scales for anxiety, depression, stress, psychological well-being, and study satisfaction. Descriptive statistics and hierarchical regression analyses were applied. Results In October 2019, out of 2835 invited students, 915 (32%) completed the survey. Lower academic satisfaction scores were strongly associated with depression (β=-.26, p<.001), anxiety (β=-.27, p<.001), and stress (β=-.70, p<.001), while higher scores with psychological well-being (β=.70, p<.001). Being female was strongly associated with anxiety and stress but not with depression or psychological well-being. Increased age was associated with enhanced psychological well-being. The nature of the academic training had a lesser impact on mental health and the academic year none. Conclusion Academic satisfaction strongly predicts depression, anxiety, stress, and psychological well-being. Training institutions should address the underlying factors that can improve students’ satisfaction with their studies while ensuring that they have access to psychosocial services that help them cope with mental distress and enhance their psychological well-being.

Subject Areas

Mental health; psychological well-being; depression; anxiety; stress; undergraduate students; Bachelor’s degree students; student academic satisfaction.

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.