Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Evaulation of a Model for Urban Vegetation Barriers’ Effects on Air Pollution

Version 1 : Received: 7 January 2021 / Approved: 8 January 2021 / Online: 8 January 2021 (16:59:01 CET)

How to cite: Nassar, R.F. Evaulation of a Model for Urban Vegetation Barriers’ Effects on Air Pollution. Preprints 2021, 2021010170 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0170.v1). Nassar, R.F. Evaulation of a Model for Urban Vegetation Barriers’ Effects on Air Pollution. Preprints 2021, 2021010170 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0170.v1).

Abstract

Air pollution is a serious global issue, responsible for approximately one in every nine deaths each year, ranking it among the greatest environmental hazards to human health. It is of particular concern in urban areas, where elevated pollutant concentrations and potential sufferers converge. Over one half of the world’s population presently lives in urban areas, and the urban population ratio is expected to reach 68% by 2050. Common air pollutants include particulate matter (PM), sulphur dioxide (SO2), ground-level ozone (O3), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO). While elevated rates of air pollution pose serious health risks for humans, outdoor plants can help reduce the harmful effects of air pollution by filtering and purifying the air around us.In this project Common Ivy, Aster and Miniature Andromeda plants were evaluated for air pollutant mitigation. In this study we developed a vegetation barrier model with the plant located in the middle of the greenhouse box, and air pollutant was sprayed on one side of the plant. Dispersion patterns of sprayed pollutants were tested with and without vegetation barrier. Measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), Formaldehyde (HCHO), Total Volatile Organic Compounds (TVOC), and Particulate Matter (PM2.5/PM10) were taken before spraying, then at 0 and 30 minutes after spraying, using both monitors.The results show mitigation rates (in 177 ft3 of air after 30 min): for TVOC the minimum reduction is 5 mg/m3; for HCHO, 1 mg/m3; for CO2, 2000 ppm; for PM2.5, 2000 ug/m3; and for PM10 it was 1000 ug/m3.

Subject Areas

Air pollution; environmental hazards; Volatile Organic Compounds

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