Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Cellular Mechanisms Participating in Brain Repair of Adult Zebrafish and Mammals After Injury

Version 1 : Received: 21 December 2020 / Approved: 22 December 2020 / Online: 22 December 2020 (08:49:39 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Ghaddar, B.; Lübke, L.; Couret, D.; Rastegar, S.; Diotel, N. Cellular Mechanisms Participating in Brain Repair of AdultZebrafish and Mammals after Injury. Cells 2021, 10, 391. Ghaddar, B.; Lübke, L.; Couret, D.; Rastegar, S.; Diotel, N. Cellular Mechanisms Participating in Brain Repair of AdultZebrafish and Mammals after Injury. Cells 2021, 10, 391.

Journal reference: Cells 2021, 10, 391
DOI: 10.3390/cells10020391

Abstract

Adult neurogenesis is an evolutionary conserved process occurring in all vertebrates. However, striking differences are observed between the taxa, considering the number of neurogenic niches, the neural stem cell (NSC) identity and brain plasticity under constitutive and injury-induced conditions. Zebrafish has become a popular model for the investigation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in adult neurogenesis. Compared to mammals, the adult zebrafish displays a high number of neurogenic niches distributed throughout the brain. Furthermore, it exhibits a strong regenerative capacity without scar formation or any obvious disabilities. In this review, we will first discuss the similarities and differences regarding (i) the distribution of neurogenic niches in the brain of adult zebrafish and mammals (mainly mouse) and (ii) the nature of the neural stem cells within the main telencephalic niches. In the second part, we will describe the cascade of cellular events occurring after telencephalic injury in zebrafish and mouse. Our study clearly shows that most early events happening right after the brain injury are shared between zebrafish and mouse including cell death, microglia and oligodendrocyte recruitment, as well as injury-induced neurogenesis. In mammals one of the consequences following an injury is the formation of a glial scar that is persistent. This is not the case in zebrafish, which may be one of the main reasons that zebrafish display a higher regenerative capacity.

Subject Areas

adult neurogenesis; brain injury; neural stem cell; regeneration; stroke; zebrafish; mice

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