Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Association Between Breakfast Skipping and Body Weight – a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Longitudinal Studies

Version 1 : Received: 16 December 2020 / Approved: 17 December 2020 / Online: 17 December 2020 (11:05:41 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Wicherski, J.; Schlesinger, S.; Fischer, F. Association between Breakfast Skipping and Body Weight—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Longitudinal Studies. Nutrients 2021, 13, 272. Wicherski, J.; Schlesinger, S.; Fischer, F. Association between Breakfast Skipping and Body Weight—A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Observational Longitudinal Studies. Nutrients 2021, 13, 272.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2021, 13, 272
DOI: 10.3390/nu13010272

Abstract

Globally, increasing rates of obesity are one of the most important health issues. The association between breakfast skipping and body weight is contradictory between cross-sectional and interventional studies. The systematic review and meta-analyses aim to summarize this association based on observational longitudinal studies. We included prospective studies on breakfast skipping and overweight/obesity or weight change in adults. Literature was searched until September 2020 in PubMed and Web of Science. Summary RRs with a 95% CI were estimated in pairwise meta-analyses by applying a random-effects model. In total, 9 studies were included in the systematic review and 6 of them were included in the meta-analyses. The meta-analysis indicated an 13% increased RR for overweight/obesity when breakfast was skipped on ≥ 3 days per week compared to ≤ 2 days per week (95% CI: 1.06, 1.21, n=3 studies). The meta-analysis on weight change displays a 21% increased RR for weight gain for breakfast skippers compared to breakfast eaters (95% CI: 1.05, 1.40, n=2 studies). The meta-analysis on BMI change displayed no difference between breakfast skipping and eating (RR=1.02, 95% CI: 0.99, 1.05, n=2 studies). This study provides low meta-evidence for an increased risk for overweight/obesity and weight gain for breakfast skipping.

Subject Areas

breakfast skipping; overweight; obesity; weight gain; BMI change; systematic review; meta-analysis; observational longitudinal studies

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