Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Comparative Study of Thermal Comfort Indices: A Melbourne CBD Case Study

Version 1 : Received: 23 November 2020 / Approved: 24 November 2020 / Online: 24 November 2020 (10:58:39 CET)

How to cite: Ng, A.W.; Muttil, N.; Balany, F.; Zegeye, B. Comparative Study of Thermal Comfort Indices: A Melbourne CBD Case Study. Preprints 2020, 2020110613 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0613.v1). Ng, A.W.; Muttil, N.; Balany, F.; Zegeye, B. Comparative Study of Thermal Comfort Indices: A Melbourne CBD Case Study. Preprints 2020, 2020110613 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0613.v1).

Abstract

This study assesses Human Thermal Comfort in two selected areas: a Green Infrastructure (GI) area represented by a garden and a high-rise building area, in the Central Business District (CBD) of Melbourne, Australia. Three-dimensional microclimatic modelling software, ENVI-met version 4 was used to simulate the microclimate. The indices of Predicted Mean Vote (PMV), Physiological Equivalent Temperature (PET) and Universal Temperature Climate Index (UTCI) were used to quantify the level of thermal comfort in the research areas. The simulation results showed that at midday, the difference in temperature between the garden area and the high-rise building area was approximately 1°C. Increasing temperatures at midday led to a change in the level of thermal comfort for both the areas, even though it was not significant. In general, the thermal perception in the GI area was slightly ‘cooler’ than in the high-rise building area. The results of the study indicated the important role of GI in improving the thermal comfort in urban areas.

Subject Areas

Green Infrastructure (GI); Human Thermal Comfort (HTC); ENVI-met; microclimate; modelling

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