Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Myofascial Force Transmission in the Humans: A Systematic Scoping Review of In-Vivo Studies

Version 1 : Received: 4 November 2020 / Approved: 5 November 2020 / Online: 5 November 2020 (14:00:07 CET)

How to cite: Ajimsha, M.; Surendran, P.; Jacob, P.; Shenoy, P.; Bilal, M. Myofascial Force Transmission in the Humans: A Systematic Scoping Review of In-Vivo Studies. Preprints 2020, 2020110212 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0212.v1). Ajimsha, M.; Surendran, P.; Jacob, P.; Shenoy, P.; Bilal, M. Myofascial Force Transmission in the Humans: A Systematic Scoping Review of In-Vivo Studies. Preprints 2020, 2020110212 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0212.v1).

Abstract

Background: The fascial system provides an environment that enables all body systems to operate in an integrated manner and is capable of modifying its tensional state in response to the stress applied to it. Recent in vitro, animal and cadaveric studies have shown that “myofascial force transfer” (MFT) has the potential to play a major role in musculoskeletal function and dysfunction.Objective: Human evidence for the existence of invivo MFT is scarce. This scoping review attempts to gather and analyse the available evidence of the in-vivo human MFT studies in order to sustain and facilitate further research and evidence based practice in this field.Methods: A search of most major databases was conducted with relevant keywords that yielded 238 articles as of August 2020. A qualitative analysis of the studies was conducted after rating it with Oxford’s Center for Evidence –based Medicine (CEBM) scale.Result: Nineteen studies ranging from randomized controlled trials to case studies covering 540 patients were included in this review. The analysed studies were highly heterogeneous and of lower methodological quality meddling with the quantitative analysis. Ten studies are confirming a ‘most likely’ existence of MFT, eight studies confirming it as ‘likely’ and one study couldn’t confirm any MFT existence in this review.Conclusion: Findings from in vivo human studies supports the animal and cadaveric studies claiming the existence of MFT which need to be corroborated by the future high quality studies. Forthcoming studies on MFT may give answers and solutions to many of the human musculoskeletal mysteries or dysfunctions.

Subject Areas

Fascia; Myofascial force transfer; epimuscular force transfer

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