Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Consumption of Fortified Infant Cereals and Association with Anemia and Growth: Insights from Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) Data Analysis

Version 1 : Received: 3 November 2020 / Approved: 4 November 2020 / Online: 4 November 2020 (10:49:03 CET)

How to cite: Detzel, P.; Prieto-Patron, A. Consumption of Fortified Infant Cereals and Association with Anemia and Growth: Insights from Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) Data Analysis. Preprints 2020, 2020110191 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0191.v1). Detzel, P.; Prieto-Patron, A. Consumption of Fortified Infant Cereals and Association with Anemia and Growth: Insights from Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) Data Analysis. Preprints 2020, 2020110191 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202011.0191.v1).

Abstract

After approximately 6 months of age, term breastfed infants are increasingly depending on other sources of iron to avoid iron deficiency anemia. The appropriate complementary feeding must include a balance composition of foods containing an adequate amount of macro- and micronutrients to reduce the risk of iron deficiency anemia. This study aims to compare the anemia and growth status of infants receiving commercial fortified infant cereals (FIC) with infants not receiving them. We use all complete multiple Demographic Health Surveys (DHS) from 2005 to 2018 to understand global infant feeding patterns. To better control for the strong household wealth effect in nutritional choices and possibly health awareness, we use propensity score technique as applied in outcome research to better control the effect of covariates. After matching and controlling for confounders, we did find a significant association between reduced risk of anemia and consumption of FIC. After matching and adjusting for confounders the small but positive effects of consumption of FIC on Height for age z-score and Weight for Height Z-score are no longer statistically significant.

Subject Areas

fortified infant cereals; anemia; growth; infants

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