Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Pore Pressure Analysis for Distinguishing Earthquakes Induced by CO2 Injection from Natural Earthquakes

Version 1 : Received: 1 November 2020 / Approved: 2 November 2020 / Online: 2 November 2020 (11:17:06 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Chhun, C.; Tsuji, T. Pore Pressure Analysis for Distinguishing Earthquakes Induced by CO2 Injection from Natural Earthquakes. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9723. Chhun, C.; Tsuji, T. Pore Pressure Analysis for Distinguishing Earthquakes Induced by CO2 Injection from Natural Earthquakes. Sustainability 2020, 12, 9723.

Journal reference: Sustainability 2020, 12, 9723
DOI: 10.3390/su12229723

Abstract

It is important to distinguish between natural earthquakes and those induced by CO2 injection at carbon capture and storage sites. For example, the 2004 Mw 6.8 Chuetsu earthquake occurred close to the Nagaoka CO2 storage site during gas injection, but we could not quantify whether the earthquake was due to CO2 injection or not. Here we simulated changes of pore pressure during CO2 injection at the Nagaoka site and compared them with estimated natural seasonal fluctuations of pore pressure due to rainfall and snowmelt as well as estimated pore pressure increases related to remote earthquakes. We clearly distinguished changes of pore pressure due to CO2 injection from those due to rainfall and snowmelt. The simulated local increase in pore pressure at seismogenic fault area was much less than the seasonal fluctuations related to precipitation and increases caused by remote earthquakes, and the lateral extent of pore pressure increase was insufficient to influence seismogenic faults. We also demonstrated that pore pressure changes due to distant earthquakes are capable of triggering slip on seismogenic faults. The approach we developed could be used to distinguish natural from injection-induced earthquakes and will be useful for that purpose at other CO2 sequestration sites.

Subject Areas

pore pressure; CO2 injection; induced earthquakes; seasonal earthquakes; remote earthquakes; seismogenic faults

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