Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Psychological Distress during COVID-19 Pandemic Distancing Precautions in Brazil

Version 1 : Received: 7 October 2020 / Approved: 8 October 2020 / Online: 8 October 2020 (13:14:13 CEST)

How to cite: Serralta, F.B.; Zibetti, M.R.; Evans, C. Psychological Distress during COVID-19 Pandemic Distancing Precautions in Brazil. Preprints 2020, 2020100178 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0178.v1). Serralta, F.B.; Zibetti, M.R.; Evans, C. Psychological Distress during COVID-19 Pandemic Distancing Precautions in Brazil. Preprints 2020, 2020100178 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202010.0178.v1).

Abstract

Mass crises are disruptive to people's mental health. The study aimed to explore mental distress during COVID-19 quarantine in a sample of university workers in Brazil. The survey included sets of questions about demographics, health, and support, an open question about major concerns, and the Clinical Outcome Routine Evaluation (CORE-OM), a measure of mental distress. 407 professionals participated in the study: mean age of 40 years (SD = 11.2), mostly female (67.8%), married (64.8%) and fulfilling social distancing to avoid COVID-19 infection (99%). Using the Consensual Qualitative Research for simple qualitative data (CQR-M) the main areas of concern were grouped into six domains, as follows: Work, Health, Isolation, Personal life and routine, Social environment, and Future. Many responses were multiple. They form categories indicating specific concerns within these domains. Quantitative data were analyzed by identifying the simple effects of potential predictors of mental distress. The results indicated medium effects of help with household chores, psychiatric treatment, age and physical exercise. Having someone available to listen was the only variable with a large effect in reducing mental suffering. The hybrid approach showed that the psychological experience during the pandemic is quite multifaceted and complex pointing new clues for public mental health.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; pandemics; quarantine; psychological distress; cross-sectional studies

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