Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Using PCM in two proposed residential buildings in Christchurch, New Zealand

Version 1 : Received: 30 September 2020 / Approved: 30 September 2020 / Online: 30 September 2020 (08:23:16 CEST)

How to cite: Schmerse, E.; Ikutegbe, C.; Auckaili, A.; Farid, M. Using PCM in two proposed residential buildings in Christchurch, New Zealand. Preprints 2020, 2020090730 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0730.v1). Schmerse, E.; Ikutegbe, C.; Auckaili, A.; Farid, M. Using PCM in two proposed residential buildings in Christchurch, New Zealand. Preprints 2020, 2020090730 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0730.v1).

Abstract

A characteristic feature of lightweight constructions is their low thermal mass which causes high internal temperature fluctuations that require high heating and cooling demand throughout the year. Phase Change Materials (PCMs) is effective in providing thermal inertia to low thermal mass buildings. The aim of this paper is to analyse the thermal behaviour of two proposed lightweight buildings designed for homeless people and to investigate the potential benefit achievable through the use of different types of PCM in the temperate climatic conditions of Christchurch, New Zealand. For this purpose, over 300 numerical simulations have been conducted using the simulation software DesignBuilder®. The bulk of the simulations were carried out under the assumption that the whole opaque building envelope is equipped with PCM. The results showed significant energy saving and comfort enhancement through the application of PCMs. Thereby, annual energy saving of over 50 % was reached for some of the PCMs considered. Additionally, the effectiveness of single, PCM-equipped structure components was investigated and substantial benefits between 19 and 27 % annual energy saving were achieved. However, occupant behaviour in terms of ventilation habits, occupancy of zones etc. remains one of the biggest challenges in any simulation work due to insufficient data.

Subject Areas

Structure component, occupant behaviour, energy savings, lightweight building and comfort enhancement

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