Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Highly Productive Boreal Ecosystem Chernevaya Taiga - Unique Rainforest in Siberia

Version 1 : Received: 14 September 2020 / Approved: 16 September 2020 / Online: 16 September 2020 (03:08:44 CEST)

How to cite: Abakumov, E.; Loiko, S.; Lashchinsky, N.; Istigechev, G.; Kulemzina, A.; Smirnov, A.; Rayko, M.; Lapidus, A. Highly Productive Boreal Ecosystem Chernevaya Taiga - Unique Rainforest in Siberia. Preprints 2020, 2020090340 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0340.v1). Abakumov, E.; Loiko, S.; Lashchinsky, N.; Istigechev, G.; Kulemzina, A.; Smirnov, A.; Rayko, M.; Lapidus, A. Highly Productive Boreal Ecosystem Chernevaya Taiga - Unique Rainforest in Siberia. Preprints 2020, 2020090340 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0340.v1).

Abstract

Boreal forests are one of the largest stores of carbon on Earth, and two-thirds of them are located in Siberia. Despite the fact that these forests have a significant influence on the global climate, they continue to remain understudied. Chernevaya taiga is a unique example of a highly productive Siberian boreal ecosystem. This type of forest is characterized by a series of unique ecological traits, the most notable of which are the gigantism of the perennial herbaceous plants and bushes, complete lack of moss cover on soil surface, and the type of soil it grows on, notable for its particularly high rate of decomposition of vegetative remains and low humic acid content. Abundant rainfall actively washes out nutrients from the top layers of the soil, but its fertility level remains very high. In fact, based on the existing data, it is twice as high as that of fertilized agricultural lands. In some ways the conditions within this type of forest closely resemble those observed in tropical rainforests. Microbiota associated with soil and plants represent an integral part of an interconnected system and contribute significantly to productive processes in soils. Its impacts on the environment require further study, since it could lead to discoveries that will help improve soil fertility without harming the natural environment.

Subject Areas

taiga; ecosystems; plant's gigantism; soil processes; spatial analysis; microbiota

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