Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Influence of Husband Consent to Family Planning and Spousal Communication on the Use of Family Planning among Young Mothers in Peri-Urban, Nigeria

Version 1 : Received: 4 September 2020 / Approved: 6 September 2020 / Online: 6 September 2020 (16:15:15 CEST)

How to cite: Bolarinwa, O.; Olagunju, O.; Olaniyan, A. Influence of Husband Consent to Family Planning and Spousal Communication on the Use of Family Planning among Young Mothers in Peri-Urban, Nigeria. Preprints 2020, 2020090148 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0148.v1). Bolarinwa, O.; Olagunju, O.; Olaniyan, A. Influence of Husband Consent to Family Planning and Spousal Communication on the Use of Family Planning among Young Mothers in Peri-Urban, Nigeria. Preprints 2020, 2020090148 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0148.v1).

Abstract

Men are perceived as significant barriers to the uptake of contraception in some communities, and lack of spousal communication regarding contraception is evident in some studies conducted in South-West and Northern Nigeria. The objective is to identify and discuss how husband consent to family planning (FP) and spousal communication influence family planning use among peri-urban dwellers in Nigeria. The study was limited to the primary dataset collected among young mothers that resides in peri-urban between the age of 15-30 years in South West, Nigeria. The result showed that the use of family planning was high among the respondents whose husband give consent to the use of family planning, and respondents who had appropriate spousal communication. Similarly, respondents whose spouse asks questions or whose husband advises on communication are likely to use FP. On the other hand, respondents whose husband didn’t give consent, respondents with inappropriate communication with the spouse, respondents whose spouses didn’t give advice, and those whose spouses didn’t ask questions are less likely to use FP.

Subject Areas

Husband Consent; Family Planning; Spousal Communication; Young Mothers; Peri-Urban

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