Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Implementation of a Delayed Prescribing Model to Reduce Antibiotic Prescribing for Suspected Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Hospital Outpatient Department, Ghana

Version 1 : Received: 31 August 2020 / Approved: 1 September 2020 / Online: 1 September 2020 (11:29:47 CEST)

How to cite: Ghebrehewet, S.; Shepherd, W.; Panford-Quainoo, E.; Shantikumar, S.; Decraene, V.; Rajendran, R.; Kushal, M.; Akuffo, A.; Ayerh, D.; Amofah, G. Implementation of a Delayed Prescribing Model to Reduce Antibiotic Prescribing for Suspected Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Hospital Outpatient Department, Ghana. Preprints 2020, 2020090008 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0008.v1). Ghebrehewet, S.; Shepherd, W.; Panford-Quainoo, E.; Shantikumar, S.; Decraene, V.; Rajendran, R.; Kushal, M.; Akuffo, A.; Ayerh, D.; Amofah, G. Implementation of a Delayed Prescribing Model to Reduce Antibiotic Prescribing for Suspected Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in a Hospital Outpatient Department, Ghana. Preprints 2020, 2020090008 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202009.0008.v1).

Abstract

This service improvement project was carried out at LEKMA Hospital, Ghana. Ghana has high levels of antimicrobial resistance (AMR). There is an urgent need to introduce models of care that optimize antibiotic prescribing. Methods Delayed / back-up prescribing is a strategy that could reduce antibiotic use in suspected upper respiratory tract infections. Four different models of delayed / back-up prescribing [no prescription; post-dated prescription (given to patient); post-dated prescription (forwarded to pharmacy); and follow-up appointment for reassessment after 3 days] were implemented in discussion between clinician and patient. Patients were contacted 10 days after their appointment to record compliance, check on their wellbeing, and rate their experience. Results Over a 3-month period (12/2019-02/2020), 142 patients were eligible for delayed / back-up prescribing. The most common clinical diagnoses were sore throat (102/140, 73%), common cold (22/140, 16%) and sinusitis (10/140, 7%). In total, 12 (9%) patients remained symptomatic at day 10, and only one individual in the entire cohort took antibiotics. Most patients (95%) rated their experience as good or very good. Conclusions Delayed / back-up prescribing models can lead to substantial reduction in antibiotic consumption amongst outpatient department patients with suspected upper respiratory tract infections. Delayed / back-up prescribing can be implemented safely in low and middle-income countries.

Subject Areas

Antimicrobial Resistance (AMR); Antimicrobial Stewardship (AMS); delayed/back-up prescribing; upper respiratory tract infections; developing countries; LMICs; Ghana

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