Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Sex Differences in Exercise Induced Bronchoconstriction in Athletes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Version 1 : Received: 26 August 2020 / Approved: 27 August 2020 / Online: 27 August 2020 (05:31:38 CEST)

How to cite: Rodriguez Bauza, D.; Silveyra, P. Sex Differences in Exercise Induced Bronchoconstriction in Athletes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Preprints 2020, 2020080591 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0591.v1). Rodriguez Bauza, D.; Silveyra, P. Sex Differences in Exercise Induced Bronchoconstriction in Athletes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Preprints 2020, 2020080591 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0591.v1).

Abstract

Exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is a common complication of athletes and individuals who exercise regularly. It is estimated that about 90% of patients with underlying asthma experience EIB. Sex differences in the prevalence of asthma have been widely reported, with higher rates in boys vs. girls before puberty, and higher rates in women than men after puberty. Because atopy has been reported to occur at higher rates in athletes than in non-athletes, in this study we investigated sex differences in EIB and atopy in athletes. A systematic literature review identified 60 studies evaluating EIB and/or atopy in post-pubertal adult athletes (n=7501). Collectively, these studies reported: 1) a 23% prevalence of EIB in athletes; 2) a higher prevalence of atopy in male athletes vs. females; 3) a higher prevalence of atopy in athletes with EIB; and 4) a significantly higher rate of atopic EIB in male vs. female athletes. Our analysis indicates that the physiological changes that occur during exercise may differentially affect male and female athletes, and suggest an interaction between male sex, exercise, and atopic status in the course of EIB. Understanding these sex differences is important to provide personalized management plans to athletes with underlying asthma and/or atopy.

Subject Areas

inflammation; atopy; exercise induced asthma; exercise induced bronchoconstriction; sex differences

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