Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Bridging the Gap between Theory, Practice, and Policy: A Decision-making Process Based on Public Health Evidence Feasible in Multistage Research on Biology Risk Factors in Poland

Version 1 : Received: 16 August 2020 / Approved: 18 August 2020 / Online: 18 August 2020 (10:57:11 CEST)

How to cite: Gębska Kuczerowska, A.; Lahiri, S.; Gajda, R. Bridging the Gap between Theory, Practice, and Policy: A Decision-making Process Based on Public Health Evidence Feasible in Multistage Research on Biology Risk Factors in Poland. Preprints 2020, 2020080381 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0381.v1). Gębska Kuczerowska, A.; Lahiri, S.; Gajda, R. Bridging the Gap between Theory, Practice, and Policy: A Decision-making Process Based on Public Health Evidence Feasible in Multistage Research on Biology Risk Factors in Poland. Preprints 2020, 2020080381 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0381.v1).

Abstract

Stakeholder input into the decision-making process when developing public health programs and policies is crucial. This article presents an innovative approach, involving online participation with a wide group of stakeholders located in different geographic locations, for policy consensus by research methodology. The results of the project have been used to propose assumptions regarding a strategy for preventing blood-borne diseases in Poland. The research was conducted iteratively using a multi-stage qualitative methodology to explore risk assessment involving blood-borne infections. The final output of the entire project is a list of key problems/challenges and solutions associated with medical and nonmedical services that are connected to the breakage of tissue continuity. Qualitative research is rare in risk assessment as priority is usually given to statistical data and end-points (quantitative studies ). Statistical data on health risk allows to assess the health implications, while the methodology applied also allowed diagnosis of the processes leading to these effects. In addition to policy preparation for blood-borne illnesses, the methodology employed in the study can also be used to successfully explore other areas of public health policy decisions.

Subject Areas

continuous quality improvement; healthcare sector; biology risk control; patient safety; research to practice

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