Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Cell Communications among Microorganisms, Plants, and Animals: Origin, Evolution and Interplays

Version 1 : Received: 16 August 2020 / Approved: 18 August 2020 / Online: 18 August 2020 (08:15:40 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 24 September 2020 / Approved: 25 September 2020 / Online: 25 September 2020 (10:40:10 CEST)

How to cite: COMBARNOUS, Y.; NGUYEN, T.M.D. Cell Communications among Microorganisms, Plants, and Animals: Origin, Evolution and Interplays. Preprints 2020, 2020080379 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0379.v1). COMBARNOUS, Y.; NGUYEN, T.M.D. Cell Communications among Microorganisms, Plants, and Animals: Origin, Evolution and Interplays. Preprints 2020, 2020080379 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0379.v1).

Abstract

Cells communicate with other cells not only within the same individual but also with cells in other individuals belonging to the same species or other species. These communications occur between two unicellular species or two multicellular species, or between unicellular and multicellular species. The molecular mechanisms involved exhibit diversity and specificity but they share common basic features which allow interferences between communications in different species. Cellular communications play pivotal roles in all uni- and multi-cellular species, leading to an outstanding variety of essential biological processes not only within each species but also for numerous favorable interactions between uni- and multi-cellular species. These interactions have been made possible by the high degree of conservation of the basic mechanisms of many ligand-receptor pairs in evolutionary remote species. Moreover these inter-species communications have played an important role during Evolution and must have been positively selected, particularly when mutually beneficial. Synchronization, by chemical communications, of populations of protocells emerging from a syncitial root could have facilitated their emergence into living cell populations and explain their resemblance among microorganisms, plants and animals.

Subject Areas

hormone; quorum sensing; receptor; bacteria; fungi; metazoa; plants; microbiota; evolution

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 19 August 2020
Commenter: Ann Tarrant
The commenter has declared there is no conflict of interests.
Comment: The manuscript is interesting. I was thinking about one of the early statements that the first signaling molecules were likely compounds released by damaged cells. I've seen this in the literature before. I was thinking that cellular waste/excretion products would likely also fit in this category and might be mentioned.
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