Preprint Review Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Impact of Strategies for Preventing Obesity and Risk Factors for Eating Disorders Among Adolescents: A Systematic Review

Version 1 : Received: 12 August 2020 / Approved: 13 August 2020 / Online: 13 August 2020 (10:38:34 CEST)

How to cite: Leme, A.C.; Haines, J.; Tang, L.; Dunker, K.; Tucunduva Philippi, S.; Fisberg, M.; Ferrari, G.L.; Fisberg, R.M. Impact of Strategies for Preventing Obesity and Risk Factors for Eating Disorders Among Adolescents: A Systematic Review. Preprints 2020, 2020080299 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0299.v1). Leme, A.C.; Haines, J.; Tang, L.; Dunker, K.; Tucunduva Philippi, S.; Fisberg, M.; Ferrari, G.L.; Fisberg, R.M. Impact of Strategies for Preventing Obesity and Risk Factors for Eating Disorders Among Adolescents: A Systematic Review. Preprints 2020, 2020080299 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202008.0299.v1).

Abstract

An effective behavior changes program is the first-line of prevention for youth obesity. However, effectiveness in prevention of adolescent obesity requires several approaches, with special attention paid to disordered eating behaviors and psychological support among other environmental factors. The aim of this systematic review was to compare the impact of two types of obesity prevention programs, inclusive of behavior change components on weight outcomes. Energy-balance studies were aimed at reducing calories from high-energy sources and increasing PA levels, while “shared risk factors for obesity and eating disorders” focused on reducing disordered eating behaviors to promote a positive relationship with food and eating. A systematic search of ProQuest, PubMed, PsycInfo, SciELO, and Web of Science identified 8825 articles. Twenty were considered “energy-balance” and fifteen “shared-risk factors for obesity and eating disorders”. Overall, energy-balance studies were unable to support a maintenance weight status, diet, and PA over time. Shared risk factors programs also did not result in significant differences in weight status over time. However, the majority of shared risk factors studies demonstrated reduced body dissatisfaction, dieting, and weight-control behaviors. More research is needed to examine how a shared risk factor approach can address both obesity and eating disorder.

Subject Areas

Obesity; Eating Disorders; Adolescents; Prevention programs; Systematic Review

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