Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Non-Enzymatic Antioxidant Responses of Mytilus galloprovincialis under Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Stress Risk

Version 1 : Received: 10 July 2020 / Approved: 11 July 2020 / Online: 11 July 2020 (09:26:12 CEST)

How to cite: Santovito, G.; Trentin, E.; Gobbi, I.; Bisaccia, P.; Tallandini, L.; Irato, P. Non-Enzymatic Antioxidant Responses of Mytilus galloprovincialis under Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Stress Risk. Preprints 2020, 2020070235 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0235.v1). Santovito, G.; Trentin, E.; Gobbi, I.; Bisaccia, P.; Tallandini, L.; Irato, P. Non-Enzymatic Antioxidant Responses of Mytilus galloprovincialis under Cadmium-Induced Oxidative Stress Risk. Preprints 2020, 2020070235 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202007.0235.v1).

Abstract

Exposure to metals is known to generate oxidative stress in living organisms, which are able to respond with the induction of antioxidant defenses, both enzymatic and non-enzymatic. The aim of this work is to study the correlation among several non-enzymatic component of the antioxidant system, that are physiologically related to both metal sequestration and defense against metal-induced oxidative stress, using the blue mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) as model organism. Specimens of this marine bivalve were experimentally exposed to cadmium (Cd), used as oxidative stress risk inducer. Cd, metallothionein (MT), glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA) contents, and glutathione reductase (GR) activity in gills and in digestive glands were assessed at 0, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 96 h. The obtained results provide new data about the relationships among the non-enzymatic antioxidant cellular components considered in this study. These constitute the prompt physiological responses to the risk of oxidative stress in blue mussels exposed to Cd in controlled laboratory conditions.

Subject Areas

cadmium; glutathione; glutathione reductase; malondialdehyde; metallothionein; Mytilus galloprovincialis; oxidative stress; ROS scavenging

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