Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Development of A Sport Foods Exchange List for Dietetic Practice in Sports Nutrition

Version 1 : Received: 22 June 2020 / Approved: 24 June 2020 / Online: 24 June 2020 (09:41:43 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Martínez-Sanz, J.M.; Menal-Puey, S.; Sospedra, I.; Russolillo, G.; Norte, A.; Marques-Lopes, I. Development of a Sport Food Exchange List for Dietetic Practice in Sport Nutrition. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2403. Martínez-Sanz, J.M.; Menal-Puey, S.; Sospedra, I.; Russolillo, G.; Norte, A.; Marques-Lopes, I. Development of a Sport Food Exchange List for Dietetic Practice in Sport Nutrition. Nutrients 2020, 12, 2403.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2020, 12, 2403
DOI: 10.3390/nu12082403

Abstract

Food exchange lists have been widely used in dietary practice in health and disease situations, but there are still no exchange lists for sports foods. The aim of this study was to develop a sports foods exchange list based on previously published statistical criteria. A cross-sectional study of the nutritional composition of sports foods, regarding macronutrients and energy, was carried out. A total of 323 sports foods from 18 companies were selected and divided into seven groups: sports drinks; sports gels; sports bars; sports confectionery; protein powders; protein bars; and liquid meals. A sports foods composition database based on portion size was created. Food exchange groups, with the definition of the amounts - in grams - of each sports foods within each group, were designed using the same methodology and statistical criteria as previously published. The nutritional composition of the portions usually consumed by athletes and/or recommended in commercial packaging was used to calculate the mean energy and macronutrient values for each group. Within each sports foods group, different subgroups were defined due to differences in the main and/or secondary macronutrient. The mean nutrient values of each exchange group and the subgroups were determined according to previously established rounding criteria. This sports foods exchange list, made up of commercial sports products, is a novel tool for dietetic practice. Its management will allow dietitians to adapt dietary plans more precisely to the training and/or competition of the athlete.

Subject Areas

food exchange list; sports foods; dietary supplements; dietetic practice; menu planning

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