Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Does Social Distancing Have an Effect on Water Quality? : An Evidence from Chlorophyll-a Level in the Water of Populated Southeast Asian Coasts

Version 1 : Received: 4 May 2020 / Approved: 6 May 2020 / Online: 6 May 2020 (04:05:08 CEST)

How to cite: Adwibowo, A. Does Social Distancing Have an Effect on Water Quality? : An Evidence from Chlorophyll-a Level in the Water of Populated Southeast Asian Coasts. Preprints 2020, 2020050091 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0091.v1). Adwibowo, A. Does Social Distancing Have an Effect on Water Quality? : An Evidence from Chlorophyll-a Level in the Water of Populated Southeast Asian Coasts. Preprints 2020, 2020050091 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0091.v1).

Abstract

The COVID 19 related social distancing is hypothesized can affect the environmental quality including the air and water quality. Correspondingly, this study aims to study how the reduction of activities of people living near the rivers and the coastal areas due to social distancing may decrease the discharges of materials and nutrients to the water body. The chlorophyll-a was used as bio indicators of nutrient contents related to the anthropogenic activities in the coast. The study was conducted in the Jakarta coast considering that this coast was surrounded by populated cities with total population equal to 16 million people. The chlorophyll-a was measured in mg/m3 and monitored using remote sensing data from January to April 2020 representing the period before and after the implementation of social distancing. The determinant environmental factor measured was sea surface temperature (0C). The study considered that there were reductions of levels and areas of chlorophyll-a in the coast. The chlorophyll-a levels were reduced from January to April (p<0.05). The chlorophyll-a levels for January, February, March, and April were 7.36 mg/m3 (95%CI: 6.34-8.37), 7.90 mg/m3 (95%CI: 7.32-8.47), 6.52 mg/m3 (95%CI: 5.37-7.66), and 4.21 mg/m3 (95%CI: 3.34-5.07) respectively. However, the differences of chlorophyll-a were not influenced by the sea surface temperature factor (p>0.05). Based on remote sensing data in January and February, the sizes of coastal areas with chlorophyll-a levels >7.00 mg/m3 were larger than areas observed in March and April. Contrarily, the coastal area sizes with low chlorophyll-a levels <5.00 mg/m3 were increasing in April. To conclude the dynamic of anthropogenic activities in coastal setting is responsible and associated with the water quality and nutrient contents as indicated by chlorophyll-a levels.

Subject Areas

coast; chlorophyll-a; COVID 19; social distancing; water

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