Preprint Case Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Central Disequilibrium Could be an Early Sign and Symptom of Rapidly Progressive SARS-CoV-2 related Respiratory Failure

Version 1 : Received: 23 April 2020 / Approved: 24 April 2020 / Online: 24 April 2020 (14:07:43 CEST)

How to cite: Zreik, A.; Ammar, A.; Hunley, C.; Madruga, M.; Khan, R. Central Disequilibrium Could be an Early Sign and Symptom of Rapidly Progressive SARS-CoV-2 related Respiratory Failure. Preprints 2020, 2020040446 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0446.v1). Zreik, A.; Ammar, A.; Hunley, C.; Madruga, M.; Khan, R. Central Disequilibrium Could be an Early Sign and Symptom of Rapidly Progressive SARS-CoV-2 related Respiratory Failure. Preprints 2020, 2020040446 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0446.v1).

Abstract

We describe a 90-year-old male presenting with disequilibrium, loss of balance and difficulty walking for three days prior to initial presentation. Interestingly, he denied cough, fever or dyspnea prior to arrival. Over the course of 48 hours, the patient developed acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) requiring intubation, diagnosed with COVID-19 infection and was treated in the intensive care unit where he died. Since the initial cases in Wuhan China in Dec 2019, the medical and epidemiological communities have learned much about the presenting features, symptomatology, epidemiology, transmission and common physical, laboratory and radiological findings of this disease. Although common symptoms are already established, it is very important to learn and record atypical symptoms or presentations of this highly contagious disease. By doing so, we will be able to recognize earlier atypical symptoms and prevent the environmental exposure to Health care workers and future patients as well. We report that Central disequilibrium may be such as initial presenting sign and symptom of impending respiratory failure from SARS-CoV-2 virus. These atypical findings such as presyncope may precede common respiratory complications of SARS-CoV-2.

Subject Areas

Central Disequilibrium; CNS; covid-19 coronavirus; SARS-CoV-2

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