Preprint Case Report Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

The clinical outcome of concurrent speech therapy and transcranial direct current stimulation in dysarthria and palilalia following traumatic brain injury: A case study

Version 1 : Received: 21 April 2020 / Approved: 24 April 2020 / Online: 24 April 2020 (13:56:38 CEST)

How to cite: Bayat, M.; Tahamtan, M.; Sabeti, M.; Nami, M. The clinical outcome of concurrent speech therapy and transcranial direct current stimulation in dysarthria and palilalia following traumatic brain injury: A case study. Preprints 2020, 2020040443 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0443.v1). Bayat, M.; Tahamtan, M.; Sabeti, M.; Nami, M. The clinical outcome of concurrent speech therapy and transcranial direct current stimulation in dysarthria and palilalia following traumatic brain injury: A case study. Preprints 2020, 2020040443 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0443.v1).

Abstract

Purpose: Dysarthria, a neurological injury of the motor component of the speech circuitry, is of common consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Palilalia is a speech disorder characterized by involuntary repetition of words, phrases, or sentences. Based on the evidence supporting the effectiveness of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) in some speech and language disorders, we hypothesized that using tDCS would enhances the effectiveness of speech therapy in a client with chronic dysarthria following TBI. Method: We applied the constructs of the “Be Clear” protocol, a relatively new approach in speech therapy in dysarthria, together with tDCS on a chronic subject who affected by dysarthria and palilalia after TBI. Since there was no research on the use of tDCS in such cases, regions of interest (ROIs) were identified based on deviant brain electrophysiological patterns in speech tasks and resting state compared with normal expected patterns using the Quantitative Electroencephalography (QEEG) analysis. Results: Measures of perceptual assessments of intelligibility, an important index in the assessment of dysarthria, ​​were superior to the primary protocol results immediately and 4 months after intervention. We did not find any factor other than the use of tDCS to justify this superiority. The percentage of repeated words, an index in palilalia assessment, had a remarkable improvement immediately after intervention but fell somewhat after 4 months. We justified this case with subcortical origins of palilalia. Conclusion: Our present case-based findings suggested that applying tDCS together with speech therapy may improve intelligibility in similar case profiles as compared to traditional speech therapy. To reconfirm the effectiveness of the above approach in cases with dysarthria following TBI, more investigation need to be pursued.

Subject Areas

traumatic brain injury (TBI); Dysarthria; transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS); Quantitative Electroencephalography (QEEG); speech therapy

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