Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Covid-19: Immunological Lessons from Bats, Pangolins and Old Coronaviruses; And How We Can Apply Them in a Timely Way for a Better Outcome

Version 1 : Received: 4 April 2020 / Approved: 6 April 2020 / Online: 6 April 2020 (16:22:42 CEST)

How to cite: Dua, D.; Yadav, M.; Jetley, P.; Dua, R. Covid-19: Immunological Lessons from Bats, Pangolins and Old Coronaviruses; And How We Can Apply Them in a Timely Way for a Better Outcome. Preprints 2020, 2020040071 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0071.v1). Dua, D.; Yadav, M.; Jetley, P.; Dua, R. Covid-19: Immunological Lessons from Bats, Pangolins and Old Coronaviruses; And How We Can Apply Them in a Timely Way for a Better Outcome. Preprints 2020, 2020040071 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202004.0071.v1).

Abstract

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic is a global crisis, the number of cases and deaths are on a steep incline. This article reviews the possible immunological mechanisms which underlie the disease pathogenesis by looking at the behaviour of previous coronaviruses not only in humans but also other mammals which possibly act as reservoir hosts. Observations: A key aspect of this coronavirus as well as the previous SARS CoV seems to be the importance of host immune response in the pathology and clinical severity of illness caused by them. A hyperactive innate immune state in combination with an exhausted adaptive immune response are possible determinants of severe illness. Conclusion: There is a possibility that the current SARS CoV 2 has immune evasive tactics similar to SARS CoV in its repertoire, since they share a 76% homology. These might have been learnt behaviour from long periods of persistence in their reservoir hosts and they may be the reason behind the dysregulated immune response evoked in humans. That in turn is highly likely to be one of the factors which govern disease severity. With this in mind we want to bring the medical community’s attention to a ‘hit early, hit hard’ intervention as a possible strategy to modify the course of the disease and bring down the numbers of severe sufferers.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; SARS CoV; macrophage activation syndrome; cytokine storm; immunology

Comments (0)

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.