Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Library and Information Science in the USA and Iran

Version 1 : Received: 17 February 2020 / Approved: 18 February 2020 / Online: 18 February 2020 (03:34:33 CET)

How to cite: Nguessan, M.; Moradi, S. Library and Information Science in the USA and Iran. Preprints 2020, 2020020257 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202002.0257.v1). Nguessan, M.; Moradi, S. Library and Information Science in the USA and Iran. Preprints 2020, 2020020257 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202002.0257.v1).

Abstract

In a context of global mobility of skilled professionals, this is a comparative study of library science education and librarianship in the USA and Iran. The study attempts to determine how education and professional skills may transfer from one country to another. Historically, the USA and Iran are two different major centers of development of knowledge, science and technology and culture. Each one of these two countries developed its own system of general education and library science education and professional practice. This study investigates the definition of the librarian profession, historical perspectives, types of librarians and librarian-related positions, the initial academic training of librarian (schools, duration, curriculum, and accreditation), daily activities of librarians, continuing education, and opportunities and challenges of the profession in each country. The qualitative research methods was selected to conduct this study. This investigation leads to a comparative analysis pointing out similarities and differences. The first part of the paper present historical perspectives and library science education and librarianship. The second part of the paper presents contemporary library science education and librarianship in each country. The last part of the paper is a comparative critical discussion of both systems. This study concludes that, even though both systems are different, with the globalization of knowledge, education, and communications, under certain circumstances, one could consider a librarian “qualified” to practice across the border. Contributions: The comparative investigation of LIS profession and education have been conducted for the first time.

Subject Areas

Library and Information Sciences; comparative study; education; profession

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